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Friday, February 09, 2007

To advice or to advise?

All my life, I have been very careless about the usage of two English words: Advice and advise. (Not that I was extremely careful with rest of my English vocabulary)

These two words are often used improperly. Most of us do not differentiate the meaning they carry, while others ignore the difference thinking one might be UK English while other is US English.

Very recently I realized the difference they carry and the context in which we should use each of these words. This post attempts to share the same.

"Advice" is a noun that means "a recommendation." "Advise" is a verb that means "to recommend." (Examples: Your advice saved me time and energy. I advise you to go to bed early tonight.)
Courtesy:www.lausd.k12.ca.us/Van_Nuys_MS/glossary%20index.html

One more example:
You advise someone or you give them advice

There’re many such words which we often use at wrong places and in wrong context. While such errors might be easily ignored in personal communication, it’s very essential that we avoid committing such mistakes, more so in business communication and professional writing.

Some of the other pairs of words which are often used wrongly:
Affect, effect
Especially, specially

Below link has a list of such word pairs with illustration of their correct usage
http://wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html#errors

Happy writing

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