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Thursday, February 01, 2007

Redundant Questions and obvious answers

There’re some questions, answers for which are fully predictable and asking these questions never serve any purpose. Still we keep asking such questions. This post list certain scenarios where asking a particular question is meaningless as the answer you get for these questions are obvious.

1. To a film star after the release of his/her latest movie
Q: How is your new movie?
A: “It is an excellent movie, I’m sure it’ll be a super hit, you should go and watch it, don’t miss” (No film star ever says “This movie hasn’t come that well, don’t waste your time and money watching it” still news paper and television journalists keeping asking this question and get the obvious answer, mainly because they want content for their media but they’ll never follow up with these stars if the movie turns out to be a flop)

2. To a fruit seller in a market:
Q: Babu are these mangoes good?
A: Yes madam they’re very good. (No seller will ever say “my products are not good, go and buy from next shop” asking them about the quality of their goods will always return a positive opinion but we still ask, mainly for our satisfaction.)

3. An employee to his manager:
Q: Will you give me better rating next year?
A: Sure. Don’t worry (No manager will ever say “next year also I’m going to give same bad rating”. It’s same the other way round. If you ask a subordinate, “will you deliver on time next time” he’ll say yes. He’ll never say next time also I’ll delay by 2 weeks.

Advertisements with customer feedbacks:
We often see advertisements in TV where customers say they used certain products and are extremely happy about it. The point is, for every one happy customer there might be ten dissatisfied customers, but no manufacturer is foolish enough to telecast negative remarks.

Politicians during election:
Every candidate says he’s going to win, his party will get majority and he’ll become minister. Irrespective of ground realities it some times becomes moral responsibility of a politician (or any leader for that matter) to up held the spirits of his followers high by speaking positive. Being honest doesn’t prove to be best policy at times

In all above scenario’s those who answer are forced by certain compulsion which doesn’t permit them to be honest. If a film star says movie is great his fans will see it at least once while if he says it’s not good, they won’t go at all. If a shopkeeper doesn’t boast about the quality of his products, customer will go to next shop. If a manager promises better ratings next year, chances are that employee will work at least till next appraisal otherwise he might resign right away.

And we still ask the questions though we know the answer. That’s mainly because we love to have an assurance and often prefer to live under hope. What do you think?



Enjoy some more photographs that came out of my camera....


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